Thursday, October 19, 2017

Ford at the Le Mans Race

Ford at the Le Mans Race 1964 Ford GT40The Le Mans race is the oldest continuous car race and has been going on since 1923, other than 1936 and the years between 1940 and 1948 due to World War II. Racing teams keep their car going for 24 hours as drivers drive prestigious and fast cars for two hours at a time. They rest for two hours and then get back to it again. Most recent changes have changed the teams from two drivers to three drivers. The race has been held in Le Mans, France and is always scheduled in the summer. 1954 JaguarOver the nearly 90 years of racing, the majority of winning automobiles have been made by European carmakers. In the first ten years of the race, the majority of winners were cars made by Bentley or Alfa Romeo. In the 1950s, the majority of winners were manufactured by Ferrari or Jaguar. The winners seemed to flip-flop between cars made in Italy and in the UK, until the late-1960s, when Ford GT40 models were back-to-back winners for four straight years. The Ford GT40 was the first American-made car to win the Le Mans. After the four Ford GT40 wins, the only other American-made entry was a McLaren F1 GTR in 1995. The first year that the Ford GT40 won, it did not just win, but a GT40 finished in first, second, and third place. The winning drivers in 1966 included Bruce McLaren a driver from New Zealand and Chris Amon. The following year, AJ Foyt and Dan Gurney took first, with McLaren’s team coming up in fourth. In 1968, only one Ford GT40 finished in the top 10 and it was raced by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi. In its final year of racing, the 1969 winning team included Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver. A second Ford GT40 finished in third place that year. Interestingly, two of the GT40 drivers, AJ Foyt and Jacky Ickx, were some of the most successful drivers in the history of the Le Mans races. Foyt won three times, which was exactly how many times he participated in the race. Ickx won six times.

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Summit Racing Equipment Opens Superstore in Arlington, Texas

Summit Racing Equipment Opens Superstore in Arlington, Texas

In case you have not heard already, Summit Racing Equipment has opened a 32,000-square foot superstore in southeast Arlington at 2200 E Interstate 20.  The huge retail store is connected to a massive warehouse where they will store all their inventory of auto parts.  All together the facility is 750,000-square feet and covers 48 acres!...   Read More

The post Summit Racing Equipment Opens Superstore in Arlington, Texas appeared first on Wilson's Auto Restoration Blog.


See original article: http://www.wilsonauto.com/wilson-auto-blog/summit-racing-equipment-opens-superstore-in-arlington-texas/

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

6 Simple tips to Help Keep Your Classic Car in Top Shape

6 Simple tips to Help Keep Your Classic Car in Top Shape

A classic car or truck needs more attention than an everyday driver to stay in top shape.  They are older and a little more temperamental and that’s why they need special care.  Many collectors also have a special bond with their dream machines and want to keep them in the best shape possible.  Treating them...   Read More

The post 6 Simple tips to Help Keep Your Classic Car in Top Shape appeared first on Wilson's Auto Restoration Blog.


See original article: http://www.wilsonauto.com/wilson-auto-blog/6-simple-tips-to-help-keep-your-classic-car-in-top-shape/

Friday, October 13, 2017

959

959

Porsche 959

Photo Courtesy of Auto Week

A true supercar of the 1980s, the Porsche 959 was created by the German car company to comply with regulations for FIA homologation. The 959 was a part of what many fans deem the Golden Age of rally racing, Group B. To satisfy rules for racing the 959 in Group B, Porsche needed to make at least 200 street-legal units. The result was the fastest road-ready car in the world at the time. Porsche ended up making 337 of these cars between 1986 and 1989.

Porsche 959

Photo Courtesy of Car and Driver

Development of the 959 goes way back to 1981 and redesigns of the 911 sports car. Leadership at Porsche wanted to test out a new all-wheel drive system and figured Group B rallying was the place for it. Development in race cars often leads to the successful creation of new sellable models, so it was a good strategy for the company.

The designers of the 959 used an already-existing, six-cylinder engine rather than creating a new one from scratch. It had a slightly smaller displacement than the contemporary 911 engine, but it was turbocharged and generated a huge 450 horsepower. The engine was linked to a six-speed manual transmission and the car was driven by a technologically-advanced all-wheel drive system.

The body of the 959 was also designed for speed. Using aluminum and Kevlar, Porsche created a lightweight powerhouse, weighing in at just over 3,000 pounds. The design also included aerodynamic considerations to further increase the car’s speed. The result was that the 959 topped out at 195 miles per hour, the fastest speed of any production car at the time that it came out. Acceleration was also impressive with the ability to reach 62 miles per hour in just 3.7 seconds.

Porsche 959

Photo Courtesy of Car and Driver

In spite of its origins as a rally car, the 959 never really made an impression in the Group B circuit. It failed to finish three races and finished first and second in just one race. Porsche was never really serious about winning with the 959. The main motivation for creating the model, and where most of the money went, was in developing new technologies for road-ready, production sports cars.

Getting the 959 into the U.S. legally in the 1980s involved pushes by Microsoft founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen. Gates’s car infamously sat in customs for 13 years before he could legally own and drive it. With so few 959 models made, and with a limited number brought to the U.S., they are rare and desirable collectibles today.

The post 959 appeared first on Fossil Cars Blog.


See original article: http://www.fossilcars.com/blog/blog/959/

Thursday, October 12, 2017

10 Collector Cars Under $10,000

10 Collector Cars Under $10,000

There is little dispute that Hagerty is the reigning expert in collector car evaluations.  They know their stuff and are considered by many to be kings in the industry.  Hagerty recently put out a list we wanted to share with you of 10 collector cars that can still be purchased for under $10 thousand dollars....   Read More

The post 10 Collector Cars Under $10,000 appeared first on Wilson's Auto Restoration Blog.


See original article: http://www.wilsonauto.com/wilson-auto-blog/10-collector-cars-under-10000/

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Drum Brakes vs. Disc Brakes: Which is Best for Your Classic Car?

Drum Brakes vs. Disc Brakes: Which is Best for Your Classic Car?

The ability to stop a car has come a long way in the past 50 years.  Computers and some amazing engineering can stop modern day cars almost on a dime.  In fact, some of these new active crash avoidance technologies can react and stop a car faster than a human ever could. Back in the...   Read More

The post Drum Brakes vs. Disc Brakes: Which is Best for Your Classic Car? appeared first on Wilson's Auto Restoration Blog.


See original article: http://www.wilsonauto.com/wilson-auto-blog/drum-brakes-vs-disc-brakes-which-is-best-for-your-classic-car/